Events: New York

Home to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, and a number of important universities, New York is frequently host to a number of events relating to the Ancient Near East.

Biblical Archaeology Society of New York

highlights

See Public Lectures schedule listed below

public lectures

Thursday 9th December 2004

6.00 / 7.30 pm: Dr Peter Feiman, What Can the Archaeology of Masada Tell Us About the Death of Jesus?, Biblical Archaeology Society of New York lecture, Delphi Restaurant, 109 West Broadway (corner of Reade Street), one block north of Chambers Street. (For public transportation, take the 1,2,3, or 9 subway to Chambers Street and you are one short block away. Take the A or C to Chambers and you are two blocks away. The E to World Trade Center (back of train) and the R to City Hall are a few blocks away). Costs: dinner + lecture $22 members, $35 non-members. Lecture only $12 members, $20 non-members. Members’ guests pay the members’ rate.

Thursday 20 January 2005

6.00 pm: Professor William G. Dever, Patriarchs and Matriarchs, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion lecture, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, 1 West 4th St (between Broadway and Mercer), Manhattan. Free admission, no registration necessary but Photo ID required for entry. For further info: email Kollel@huc.edu, tel 212-824-2296

Wednesday 9 February 2005

6.00 pm: Professor Gabriel Barkay, The Oldest Biblical Verses in Jerusalem, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion lecture, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, 1 West 4th St (between Broadway and Mercer), Manhattan. Free admission, no registration necessary but Photo ID required for entry. For further info: email Kollel@huc.edu, tel 212-824-2296

Wednesday 13 April 2005

6.00 pm: Professor Jodi Magness, Ossuaries and the Burial of Jesus and James, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion lecture, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, 1 West 4th St (between Broadway and Mercer), Manhattan. Free admission, no registration necessary but Photo ID required for entry. For further info: email Kollel@huc.edu, tel 212-824-2296

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study days

There are currently no Study Days advertised for New York.

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exhibitions

Assyrian Reliefs Reinstallation
Long-term, opens November 2002
Brooklyn Museum of Art, Hagop Kevorkian Gallery of Ancient Middle Eastern Art, 3rd Floor

Twelve monumental, alabaster reliefs from the Northwest Palace of the Assyrian king Ashur-nasir-pal II (883-859 B.C.E.) at Nimrud. The Assyrians ruled ancient Mesopotamia (modern Iraq and part of Syria) from the ninth to seventh centuries B.C.E., when they were the great power of the ancient Middle East. During this time, sprawling palaces with scores of rooms whose walls featured massive stone slabs, many nearly seven feet tall. Skilled relief-carvers decorated the stone surfaces with majestic images of kings, divinities, magical beings and sacred trees.

Egyptian Galleries Reinstallation
Long-term, open March 2003
Brooklyn Museum of Art, Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 3rd floor

Female figurine, Egyptian Predynastic period, Brooklyn MuseumThis reinstallation will complete its final phase when 557 objects, including some of the most important works of ancient Egyptian art in the world, are installed in seven newly designed galleries on the Museum’s third floor. These items, some not on view since the early 20th century, date from the Predynastic Period (4400 BCE) to the Eighteenth-Dynasty reign of Amenhotep III (1353 BCE). Included are such treasures as the exquisite chlorite-stone head of a Middle Kingdom princess, an early classic stone Deity from 2650 BC, a relief from the tomb of Akhethotep, and a highly abstract female mud-figure created over 5,000 years ago. Also on view for the first time will be the completely reassembled tomb of a major Twelfth-Dynasty official. The new galleries will be arranged chronologically starting with the oldest pieces and include thematic displays exploring such topics as the connection between art and writing and the relationship between Egyptians and other ancient peoples. Additionally, computers and monitors will provide in-depth information about the objects themselves. This exhibition completes a ten-year project, which began in 1993 when nearly 600 objects from the Museum’s world-renowned Egyptian holdings were put on permanent view. With over 1150 Egyptian artifacts in place, the completed galleries will make available one of the finest collections in the world with masterpieces from every period in ancient Egyptian history.

 

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